Colonel March of Scotland Yard

Colonel March of Scotland Yard

1953 - United Kingdom

Based on John Dickson Carr's collection of short stories first published in 1940 under the title The Department of Queer Complaints, Colonel March was a British series made in 1953 by Sapphire, although it didn't get a UK airing until the birth of Independent Television in 1955, by which time three of its (compilation) episodes had been released as a feature film; Colonel March Investigates

Playing the one-eyed detective was Hollywood screen legend Boris Karloff, who had won recognition in Universal's acclaimed 1931 production of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's classic horror story, Frankenstein. Working out of D-3, Scotland Yard's department for seemingly unsolvable cases, March's investigations brought him into contact with the impossible, the unnatural and the supernatural. However, with dogged determination the good detective, aided and abetted on occasions by Ewan Roberts, Eric Pohlmann and Richard Wattis managed to solve such mysteries as The Case of the Lively Ghost, The Sorcerer and The Second Mona Lisa.

Published on December 4th, 2018. Written by Laurence Marcus for Television Heaven.

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